How Many Scripture References Can You Find?

How many Scripture References can you find_Charles Spurgeon once said of John Bunyon “prick John Bunyan…he will bleed Bible.” I am currently reading through Pilgrims Progress for my umpteenth time, and, as always, I am amazed at how many nods to verses of scripture can be found on every page. So with that in mind here is the opening paragraph from when Christian meets Faithful. How many bible verses can you find alluded to in this passage?

“As Christian went on his way, he came to a hill which was cast up on purpose that pilgrims might see before them. Up Christian went; and looking forward, he saw Faithful before him upon his journey. Then said Christian aloud, “Ho, ho! So-ho! stay, and I will be your companion.” At that Faithful looked behind him, and Christian cried again, “Stay, stay, till I come up to you.” But Faithful answered, “No, I am fleeing for my life, and the avenger of blood is behind me.” At this Christian was somewhat moved; and putting forth all his strength, he quickly got up with Faithful, and outran him: so the last was first. Then did Christian boastfully smile, because he had gotten in front of his brother; but, not taking good heed to his feet, he suddenly stumbled and fell, and could not rise again until Faithful came up to help him.”

The Memory Of Old Jack by Wendell Berry – Book Review

Image result for the memory of old jackI always enjoy spending time in Port William, but this time was a bit more tragic. Wendell Berry has a way of taking what appears to be an ordinary, well-lived, life of a man in Kentucky and showing you the hidden tensions and pressures that are at work. Sometimes the seemingly trivial choices we make have profound emotional repercussions, even if no one else will ever see them. To borrow a metaphor from Andrew Peterson, they are like mountains on the ocean floor.

Jack Beechum is nearing the end of his life, and Berry gives us insight into the memories he holds, even while that memory appears to be fading to those around him. As always in Berry’s writings, the expression of Jack’s tragedies and triumphs will be tied to his land in multiple ways. I have read most of the Port Williams series, and Jayber Crow and Hannah Coulter still top my list. The first half of this one left me wondering if this would be my least favorite, then it began to come together. This book may now be my third favorite, not because of the enjoyment it gave me, but because of the glimpse it gave me into the emotional complexities of life. It functioned more like a warning shot than a target at which to aim. While at the same time, it did not fail to leave a little hope in its wake.

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The Memory of Old Jack – Buy on Amazon

Talent Magnet by Mark Miller – Book Review

Image result for top talent mark millerTop talent looks for different qualities in a place of employment than average talent. The problem is, most employers run their businesses, and market their open positions, in a way that is only attractive to typical talent. This book sets out to answer the questions, what do top talent look for in a job, and how do you become a business that is attractive to them?

Written in story format, similar to the works of Patrick Lencioni, but not quite as effective, this books starts out a little slow. It is in the second half of the book that you will find the information you are seeking. It will not be as profound as you had hoped, but it will be helpful.

I assume, if you are reading a book like this, you are probably a top talent worker yourself. In that case, you can let me know if the points made in this book resonated with you. A three-star rating seemed a little low, and four stars seemed a little high, so I decided to give it the benefit of the doubt- 4 stars.

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Talent Magnet by Mark Miller – Buy on Amazon

Tiny Tim’s Christmas Thought

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“Somehow he [Tim] gets thoughtful sitting by himself so much, and thinks the strangest things you ever heard. He told me, coming home, that he hoped the people saw him in the church, because he was a cripple, and it might be pleasant for them to remember upon Christmas Day, who made lame beggars walk, and blind men see.”

– Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol