Confronting the Chaos of Our Culture with the Love of Christ

Our culture seems to be described perfectly in 2 Timothy 3:2-4. It says, “Men will be lovers of self, lovers of money, boastful, arrogant, revilers, disobedient to parents, ungrateful, unholy, unloving, irreconcilable, malicious gossips, without self-control, brutal, haters of good, treacherous, reckless, conceited, lovers of pleasure rather than lovers of God.”

As Christians, what is more important than the description of the culture is how scripture calls believers to respond in times like this. The righteous are not to be afraid of bad news; their heart is to be firm, trusting in the Lord (Psalm 112:7). Yet, many churchgoers seem to be at their whit’s end as they watch it all unfold. It is as if they believe this fiery trial is something strange (1 Peter 4:12). It seems we have had it so good for so long that we have forgotten what the Bible promised us. It says, “Indeed, all who desire to live godly in Christ Jesus will be persecuted. (2 Tim. 3-12).” In the west, Christians need to remember that the persecution of the church was not put to death; it was only made sick, and it is beginning to recover.

If you asked many believers if they would be willing to die for Jesus, they would say “yes,” yet the sad reality is more and more church members are indicating that even after COVID is no longer a threat, they would prefer to keep watching church online. Their couch and their coffee seem to be too much to sacrifice. Besides, with the world raging around us, our home feels safer, but being safe is not our calling.

If the troubles of 2020 are causing you to lose your spiritual nerve, it would be helpful to recall Paul’s words to Timothy in light of his fallen culture. Paul encouraged Timothy by telling him to “kindle afresh the gift of God that is in you (2 Tim. 1:6). That gift is the faith God has given us through the Holy Spirit. Our lives are to be marked by his presence. Instead of cowering in the corner, we are to remember that God has not given us a spirit of fear, but of power, love, and self-control (2 Tim. 1:7).

Now is not the time to be ashamed of our faith, we must be willing to stand with those who are persecuted, and be ready to join them in their suffering if called to do so (2 Tim. 1:8): even as a criminal (2 Tim. 2:9). Remember, when the world comes after you, they will not say it is because you are a Christian, they will make up some other charge, and they will be charges of unlawfulness which will have accompanying penal codes. Countless Christians throughout history have been locked up and even put to death in such a manner.

However, there is no reason for us to fear. Jesus has abolished death, so be strong (2 Tim. 1-10). If we are unable to look at the attacks on biblical truth in our culture through the lens of the resurrection, then it is proof that we need to kindle our faith afresh. Are you spiritually minded enough that you would be willing to suffer hardship like a good soldier (2 Tim. 2:3)?

Repentance starts at home. The Lord knows who are his, and everyone who names the name of the Lord is to abstain from wickedness (2 Tim. 2:19). Even if the world calls us a danger to society for doing it. If we cleanse ourselves from these things, we will be a vessel of honor, sanctified, useful to the Lord (2 Tim. 2:21). As we see what appears to be the slow collapse of the culture around us, it is time for the church to be a city on a hill. It is time for Christians to be salt and light. The way we do that is not by following the world’s pattern of grasping for power. We are to confront the culture with the love of Christ. This means to love our enemies, bless those who curse us, be meek, humble of heart, and be willing to be persecuted for his name’s sake.

Why would we do that? The love of Jesus. We love our great Savior, and we love the ungodly. We understand them because we used to be them. We have been lovers of self, unholy, ungrateful, and unloving. We know that the sexually immoral, the idolater, the adulterer, and those who practice homosexuality will not inherit the kingdom of God (1 Cor. 6:9-10). More than that, we understand that such were some of us, but we were washed, we were sanctified. The wrath of God that stood over us for our sins, Christ bore on the cross as our substitute. We have been justified in the name of Jesus (1 Cor. 6:11).

Jesus has blotted out our iniquities and removed our death sentence. What else could we need? What else could we want? What else do we have to fear? Because of his great love for us, we deny ourselves, take up or cross, and follow him (Matt. 16:24). We are no longer debtors to the flesh to live according to its dictates (Romans 8:12). By the spirit, we resist our sinful desires because we have a greater love: Jesus Christ. The world is living according to the flesh, and those who live according to the flesh will die (Rom. 8:13). The wages of sin still hangs over them. We cannot, and we will not participate in their ways. We will not go back to the bondage now that Christ has set us free.

We will call the lost world to salvation in Jesus, even if many in this world hate us for it. We will continue to the point the way because it is what they need more than anything. If they must go to hell, let us make them leap over our dead bodies to get there (C. Spurgeon). Greater love has no one but this, that someone would be willing to lay down their life for them (John 15:13). As we share in the suffering of Christ, our pain will be a present reality of how much he loves them. There is no wrath or torment that man can throw our way to make us move. There is no peace this world can offer that can compare to the peace of God and the eternal glory that awaits.

The world may do terrible things to the Church, but, in a fallen world, times of trial and persecution are often when the gospel shines the brightest. Persecution will indeed blow away the tares among us. I fear many professing Christians have forgotten our calling. They have lost the plot and traded it in for a life of pursuing earthly pleasures. In times of trouble, we will see many go out from us because they were never really of us (1 John 2:19). At that point, we will not hate them for their betrayal; we will see their lost spiritual condition, love them, and call them to find salvation in Jesus in the same way we do for all the lost. The chaos of our culture is not a threat to our witness; it is a prime opportunity for it. Indeed, all who desire to live for Jesus will be persecuted, and through it, our great God will be glorified as we confront the world with the love of Christ.

-D. Eaton

I Have Been Praying 15 Years for Faith

A stranger to the life of faith makes a snuffle at believing, and thinks no work so easy, or so trifling. He wonders why such gentle business should be called the fight of faith, and why the chosen twelve should pray for faith, when, as they believe, every human brain might quickly furnish out a handsome dose.

For my own part, since first my unbelief was felt, I have been praying fifteen years for faith, and praying with some earnestness, and am not yet possessed of more than half a grain. You smile, Sir, I perceive, at the smallness of the quantity; but you would not, if you knew its efficacy. Jesus, who knew it well, assures you that a single grain, and a grain as small as mustard-seed, would remove a mountain; remove a mountain-load of guilt from the conscience, a mountain-lust from the heart, and any mountain-load of trouble from the mind.

The Saviour’s word to his people is, Fear not, stand still, and see the salvation of God. (Exodus 14:13). In quietness and confidence shall be your strength (Isaiah. 30:15). Cast thy burden on the Lord, and he shall support thee (Psalm 55:22). Look to me for salvation, all the ends of the earth (Isaiah 14:22). Call on me in time of trouble, I will deliver thee, and thou shalt glorify me (Psalm 50:15).

-John Berridge

Was That Worship?

For many evangelicals, it seems goosebumps are the litmus test as to whether a song is anointed, but an emotional reaction can be misleading. I once had a co-worker who loved just about everything Disney. He put a sticker on his car, and he would proudly wear Disney hats and shirts. He was one of the managers at the store where I was working at the time, and I remember one day when everything was going wrong, he said to me, “when this day is over I am going home, and I’m going to watch an old Disney movie.” When I pressed him a bit as to why he chose to watch an old Disney movie as opposed to anything else, he said, “Disney things just bring me back to when I was a kid.” Ultimately, there was a sense of nostalgia from all the memories of growing up, and these things moved his affections in a way that made him feel a bit better after a hard day.

On another note, music has a way of doing the same type of things for us. I can remember in high school and college when I would be listening to secular radio, and that new song that I had been waiting to hear would come on. Immediately, I would turn up the volume, and I would be energized by what I was hearing. I would sing along with all the passion I could muster, sometimes to questionable lyrics.

There is nothing wrong with a bit of nostalgia and being energized or moved by some piece of music, provided the context is not sinful. Still, when you put these things together with a Christian worship service or program, we must be careful to discern our emotions. I bring this up because sometimes we can be misled to think that we have had a time of worship, or that we have heard a great sermon, on the sole basis that it moved our affections.

We must pay close attention to what is stirring our hearts to discern whether what we are experiencing is worship or even spiritual. When the worship leader plays the first chords of our favorite praise song, are we being energized much like the natural man who hears a secular song that causes him to turn up the radio, or are we genuinely worshipping? When grandma’s favorite hymn starts to play and causes us to experience a time of peace and contentment while thinking back to when she used to sing it to us as a child, do we sometimes confuse that with worship?

Now, I am not saying we should only sing dull songs or songs that do not remind us of anything, or that it is impossible to be genuinely worshipping during these times. On the contrary, I think it can be helpful to remember our family worship from when we were growing up, and I believe it is good that we still have people today writing new psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs for us to sing that gets us excited. What I want to stress is that merely because we have these moments, does not mean we are worshipping or that we have drawn near to God in adoration.

Charles Spurgeon once said that if he wanted to, he could move congregations to tears by telling them sad stories of mothers with sick children or energize them by telling them stories of men and women who accomplished great things. He then went on to say, it would be a waste of time unless they were moved to cry over their sin and take joy in Christ and the cross. In other words, were their hearts and attention drawn to Jesus?

Even the natural man’s affections move in powerful ways, but those emotional stirrings will never be worship unless the truth of scripture moves us as the Holy Spirit points us to Christ and what He has done for us. Whether we attend a modern or traditional worship service is not the biggest issue, but we must be sure to seek out worship and preaching that convicts us of sin and shows us the remedy in Christ, which is the foundation of all true spiritual worship.

-D. Eaton-

The Peace of Christ or a Dead Calm?

Many people think they have peace with God, but their lack of concern about their standing with him is a deception of their spiritually dead soul. There is a peace that passes all understanding, and in times like we were living in now, it is one of the most blessed aspects of the Christian life. The foundation of this peace is the cross of Jesus, where our sins found forgiveness, and the wrath of God is satisfied. The moment we trust in the atoning work of Christ, we are at peace with God objectively. From there, that truth begins to give us peace subjectively as God sheds his love abroad in our hearts by the Holy Spirit (Romans 5:5).

The problem is, many people believe they are at peace with God, but because of their sins, they are still at enmity with him. Though they experience no distress at the thought of the holiness of God, it is not the peace of Christ they are experiencing; it is a dead calm. Scripture tells us to examine ourselves to see if we are in the faith. There are signs that manifest if what we are experiencing is not the peace of Christ but is, in reality, the stillness of a spiritually dead soul. Here are six telltale signs of a dead calm.

1. Peace Without Heavenly Joy

One of the first signs that the peace we are experiencing is not the peace of Christ is that it is not accompanied by heavenly joy. The person who is alive in Christ and has experienced the conviction of sin, knows that there is no more significant dilemma in life. Once we have been awakened to the fact that hell is the only proper punishment for our sins and we find salvation in the cross of Jesus, all other problems in life pale in comparison. From there flows joy unspeakable and full of glory (1 Pet. 1:8), and that joy of the Lord will be our strength. If you find yourself unconcerned with your spiritual state before the Lord, but there is no joy in Christ Jesus, you may be experiencing the ease of a deceitful heart.

2. Peace That Rests on Our Own Merit

The second evidence that we do not have the peace of Christ can be seen when we consider our good-standing with God, and we base his favor on our character; when we think of all we do for the church, how we help the community, and think, “Of course, I have peace with God, look at all the good I do.” To further deceive ourselves, we often try to convince ourselves of our worthiness by looking around at the sins of others and see how we have avoided many vices that others have embraced. It is this comparison to other people that causes us to take comfort while we are still in our sins. This confidence in our goodness is a sure sign that we are experiencing the calm of a spiritually dead soul. Even if we claim the merits of the blood of Jesus, but believe our justification in Christ is a mixture of his death and our works, scripture says we are lost. We are saved by faith apart from works (Rom. 3:28); it is entirely the merit of Christ that brings us into a right relationship with him. If we add righteousness of our own, we condemn ourselves because our righteousness is like filthy rags (Isaiah 64:6).

3. The Things of God are Barren and Dry

The third sign that our peace is not of God is exposed if we find the things of God barren and dry. This is when we have no hunger for the word of God, and when we try to feed upon it, it is like ashes in our mouth. If we can find more joy in an obscene Netflix series, than a time of prayer and Bible reading, something is seriously amiss with our spiritual condition.

4. Peace That is Easily Disturbed by Life’s Troubles

The fourth indicator deals with our response to trials. When life is going smoothly, our calm continues, but when troubles arise, so does the desperation of our heart. If life’s calamities have sent us into a tailspin of despair, the peace we are experiencing may not have been born of God.

Peace born of the flesh trembles when the things of the flesh tremble. Peace born of the Spirit of God looks to God himself who does not move, even when the earth gives way and the mountains fall into the sea (Psalm 46:2). There will be times of lament, sorrow, grief, and distress in the life of the Christian, but though we may be perplexed, we will not despair (2 Cor. 4:8).

5. Death Will Be Fierce

If we are reading this, we have not yet experienced this last one, but if worldly peace is not replaced with true peace with God, our deathbed will be a harrowing experience. Only the believer strengthened by the Holy Spirit is able to say, “Death, where is your sting. Grave, where is your victory. (1 Cor. 15:55)” A peace founded on the things of the world and confidence in the flesh will die when the flesh begins to perish.

As you went through this list, was any of this true of you? If so, it can only mean one of two things. 1. We are not a child of God, and we need to confess our sinfulness to the Lord, and trust entirely in the merits of Jesus, and the work he did on our behalf. Or 2. We are a believer, but our heart is still trying to find its hope and peace in this life. We must grow to be more spiritually-minded. If we do not, we may be saved, but we will suffer great loss as our carnal works are burned up on the day of judgment. We will be saved, but as one through fire (1. Corinthians 3: 15).

None of us are without sin. It is time for all of us to draw up under the wings of our Savior, and find joy in our salvation as the Holy Spirit works in our hearts. The revived joy will make the things of God more precious to us than anything this world can offer, and life’s storms will not be able to take our peace. Finally, on the day we die, death will not have its sting, and the grave will not have its victory.

-D. Eaton

Why Many People are Experiencing Anxiety at the Thought of Life Getting Back to Normal


As the nation slowly lifts its restrictions, there is a conflict going on in the hearts of many people. While many are tired of the lockdowns and rejoice at the thought of going to work, getting out to see friends, sitting in a restaurant, going shopping, and even gathering at church, many of those same people are experiencing anxiety about life returning to normal. Why is that? The answer that is not what you would expect.

The reason many people are feeling anxious about life returning to normal has nothing to do with the threat of COVID-19. Even when they look further into the future when the coronavirus threat is gone completely, their hearts still shiver at the thought of going back to the way things were.

Though many people have personally experienced economic distress, been rightly concerned about government overreach, and have dealt with the emotional fallout due to the lack of face-to-face human interaction, there are aspects of this cultural slowdown that many people have enjoyed.

It is possible to hate every negative aspect listed above and yet still unselfishly enjoy the fact that you now have more time with your family. It is no contradiction to detest the economic decline and at the same time to feel stress levels drop when you drive because the freeways are clear, and you are now able to get to your destination in half the time. It is even possible to feel the emotional toll on your children when they cannot participate in the activities they love and still find relief that you can enjoy your weekend without having to be in five different places on Saturday.

Though these benefits of the pandemic lockdown certainly have not outweighed the costs, the current cultural slowdown has many people reexamining their lives and asking the question, “What kind of life do I want to live when this is all over?” The thought of “everything” going back to normal can be a cause of concern for many people.

The way through this anxiety is to consider carefully what to let back in your life and what to discard. As we bring each piece of our old life back into play, we need to ask ourselves, what price am I willing to pay for the reward this gives me. Most activities will require little thought. Going back to work, being active in your church, and a host of other things will, and should, be embraced with open arms. However, for example, maybe Sunday should only be reserved for worship, family, and friends. Perhaps we were created to have a day of rest, and part of the anxiety we feel at the thought of going back to the way things were, stems from the fact that we had abandoned that practice. Maybe human flourishing happens best when we have a day of rest each week.

If our lives were so busy that we did not have time to enjoy our families or to pause and reflect, going back to “normal” is certainly not healthy. Some people were so overloaded they never had time to consider the purpose of it all until now.  As we add pieces back into our lives, it is perfectly acceptable to leave unnecessary activity out if it adds little value to your life yet contributes to your exhaustion. It is not only acceptable, it is the right thing to do.

As authorities lift restrictions, now is the perfect time to ask ourselves, “What kind of life do I want to live?” As Christians, self-examination is an essential discipline of our spiritual lives. We are called continually, and especially on the Lord’s Day, to pause and realign our lives to God’s design for us. Maybe realizing we have permission to live a less-frantic life, even when all this is over, will calm the misgivings that arise at the thought of the lockdowns ending.

Hectic lives are often the result of having too many targets we are trying to hit; too many masters we are trying to please. As Jesus said, we are not able to serve more than one master (Matt. 6:24). My prayer is that during the weeks of quarantine, the Lord has reminded us all that there is only one worthy calling, and that is to glorify God and enjoy him forever. Whatever does not tend toward this glorious end in our lives is expendable.

-D. Eaton

Don’t Let Your Unworthiness Keep You From Jesus

  • When the Spirit would glorify Jesus, He humbles you.
  • When He would glorify His fullness, He makes you feel your emptiness.
  • When He would bring you to rely on His strength, He convinces you of your weakness.
  • When He would magnify the comforts of Jesus, He makes you sensible of your misery.
  • When He would fix your heart on His Heaven, He makes you feel your deserved Hell.
  • When He would exalt His righteousness, you find that you are a poor, miserable sinner.

My friend, let nothing keep you from Jesus. Whatever you need, whatever you feel is wrong with you, may it bring you to the Savior’s fullness! Oh, that all things may help forward your acquaintance with Him, I except nothing, neither sin nor sorrow! I would carry all to Him as one great lump of sin, and receive all from Him, as the only storehouse of good for wretched sinners.

In this communion I desire to grow; for this I desire to live. Oh, that you and I may learn it more, and every day get nearer fellowship with our sweet Jesus, growing up into Him in all things.

-William Romaine

You Gave Me Health, and I Misused It

You gave me health to use in your service, but I misused it to a wholly secular use. Now you have sent me a sickness for my correction. O let me not use this likewise to provoke you, by my impatience. I abused my health, and you have rightly dealt with me. O keep me now from abusing that also. And since the corruption of my nature distorts your favors to me, grant, O my God, that your all-prevailing grace may render your chastenings to be beneficial. If my heart has been in love with the world when I was in robust health, destroy my vigor to promote my salvation. Whether it be by weakness of or by zeal for your love, render me incapable of enjoying the worldly idols, that my delight may be only in you.

Blaise Pascal – A Prayer He Prayed During A Time of Sickness

Christianity Outlives the Rise and Fall of Empires

Christianity has thus passed through many stages of its earthly life, and yet has hardly reached the period of full manhood in Christ Jesus. During this long succession of centuries it has outlived the destruction of Jerusalem, the dissolution of the Roman empire, fierce persecutions from without, and heretical corruptions from within, the barbarian invasion, the confusion of the dark ages, the papal tyranny, the shock of infidelity, the ravages of revolution, the attacks of enemies and the errors of friends, the rise and fall of proud kingdoms, empires, and republics, philosophical systems, and social organizations without number. And, behold, it still lives, and lives in greater strength and wider extent than ever; controlling the progress of civilization, and the destinies of the world; marching over the ruins of human wisdom and folly, ever forward and onward; spreading silently its heavenly blessings from generation to generation, and from country to country, to the ends of the earth.

It can never die; it will never see the decrepitude of old age; but, like its divine founder, it will live in the unfading freshness of self-renewing youth and the unbroken vigor of manhood to the end of time, and will outlive time itself. Single denominations and sects, human forms of doctrine, government, and worship, after having served their purpose, may disappear and go the way of all flesh; but the Church Universal of Christ, in her divine life and substance, is too strong for the gates of hell. She will only exchange her earthly garments for the festal dress of the Lamb’s Bride, and rise from the state of humiliation to the state of exaltation and glory. Then at the coming of Christ she will reap the final harvest of history, and as the church triumphant in heaven celebrate and enjoy the eternal sabbath of holiness and peace. This will be the endless end of history, as it was foreshadowed already at the beginning of its course in the holy rest of God after the completion of his work of creation.

-Philip Schaff

CCM Backbeat: How Well Do You Know 80’s Christian Music?

This one is purely for fun. In 1985, in response to Band Aid and the gathering of secular artists around a cause, Steve Camp gathered upward to 90 Christian musicians to form the C.A.U.S.E (Christian Artists United to Save the Earth). They recorded the song, Do Something Now, and the accompanying video below. This video is essentially the who’s who of 80’s Christian music. Take a minute to watch the video and see how many you recognize.

Count how many you can name, and use the chart below to see how well you know 80’s Christian music. I will post the full list of everyone in the video at the bottom of this post.

Score Chart – How many could you name?

List of Artists

Soloists (In order of appearance):

  • Amy Grant
  • Larry Norman
  • Kathy Troccoli
  • Russ Taff
  • Evie Karlsson
  • Phil Keaggy
  • Scott Wesley Brown
  • Michelle Pillar
  • Steve Camp
  • Sandi Patti
  • Dana Key
  • Mylon LeFevre
  • Jessy Dixon
  • Steve Taylor
  • Matthew Ward
  • 2nd Chapter of Acts
  • Sheila Walsh

The Choir

  • Sandi Patti
  • Jessy Dixon
  • Angie Lewis
  • Kim Perry
  • Geoff Moore
  • Lanny Wolfe
  • Candy Hemphill 
  • Dana Key
  • Ed DeGarmo
  • DMB Band
  • Sue Dodge
  • Karen Kelly
  • Cam Floria
  • Pete Carlson
  • Billy Crockett
  • Chris Christian
  • Gary Chapman
  • Rob Frazier
  • Bobby Jones and Newlife
  • Tami Gunden
  • Larry Bryant
  • Flo Price 
  • 2nd Chapter of Acts 
  • Matthew Ward
  • Glad
  • Amy Grant
  • Russ Taff
  • John Fischer
  • Owen Brock
  • Jim Murray 
  • Mylon LeFevre
  • Shirley Caesar
  • David Meece
  • Sherman Andrus
  • Phil Keaggy
  • Lisa Whelchel
  • Robin Crow
  • Pam Mark Hall
  • Brown Bannister
  • Kathy Troccoli
  • Billy Sprague
  • Doug Oldham
  • Amy Fletcher
  • Larry Norman
  • Michael Card
  • Steven Green
  • Michelle Pillar
  • Scott Wesley Brown
  • Silverwind
  • Sheila Walsh
  • Connie Scott
  • Rick Cua
  • Steve Camp 
  • Glenn Kaiser 
  • Steve Taylor
  • Dennis Agajanian
  • Bob Farrell
  • Morgan Cryar
  • Bill and Gloria Gaither
  • Found Free
  • Rusty Goodman
  • Gary McSpadden
  • Evie Karlsson

Who were some of your favorite Christian artists of the 80’s? Let me know in the comments.

-D. Eaton

CCM Backbeat: Top 10 Christian Music Videos

In the 80’s, as we know, video killed the radio star, and secular music set the trend that Christian music slowly followed. There were two reasons why Christian music was slow to begin producing quality music videos. First, there were budget issues. Producing an album in the 80’s cost tens of thousands of dollars. The technology was not as readily available as it is today, and this applied to video production as well. The second reason CCM was slow to catch on to the music video trend was, even if you could afford to produce a video, who was going to play it? Eventually, however, it began to happen, Christians started making music videos that caught our attention.

Today, I want to countdown 10 Christian music videos that made an impact. Since this is a CCM backbeat, we will not be looking at current CCM artist. This list will only contain music from the 1980’s through the early 2000’s. I do have one entry in here a recent at 2008, but that is an exception. No, there will not be any Carman videos in this list. Though many of his videos are notable, Carman deserves a CCM Backbeat of his own. He is the Nickleback of Christian music, or should I say, Nickleback is the Carman of secular music. Carman is the artist Christians love to hate, some of it is deserved, and some of it is not. We will explore that topic another time.

With all of the preliminaries out of the way, here are the top 10 music videos that made us sit up and take notice.

10. Two Sets of Jones’ – Big Tent Revival (1995)

In the mid-90’s, Big Tent Revival gave us a powerful song that reminded us that the possession of the world are not the not the key to happiness. This video, filmed as a home movie, resonates with most of us even if it may be a bit overstated. Rewatching this video brings back memories of when my wife and I were a young married couple setting out on the adventure called life. It was at that point we needed a foundation upon which to build our life together. This song still has the power to bring us back to that reality. Our hope is found in nothing less than Jesus’ blood and his righteousness.

9. Supertones Strike Back – O.C. Supertones (2002)

Unless you lived in Orange County, CA, this video may have seemed to come out of nowhere. Interesting story, in Orange County, several Christian bookstores actually held release parties at midnight when this sophomore album released, and the lines wrapped around the building. A friend of mine hosted one such party. He was amazed when I told him my experience of trying to buy the album.

I was traveling in Texas the day the album released. I went to one of the largest Christian bookstores I had ever seen to pick up a copy. I walked in, and it was nowhere to be found. So I found a worker and asked them if they had it. He said he had never heard of them, but he would check the back. Sure enough, they were still in a box in the back.

It would not be long before they knew of this band because this song and video travelled fast. It even saw crossover success finding play on a few secular stations. The world was learning that ska was cool (well, at least for a few years), and Christian music had one of the best bands.

8. Cash Cow – Steve Taylor (1993)

After a few year away from CCM with a secular band called Chagall Guevara, Steve Taylor came home with a new album called Squint in 1993 which was nothing less than brilliant. Along with the album came a VHS release of videos for each song, and Cash Cow was a standout; a rock opera in three acts.

Capturing the mood of early 90’s alternative rock, this dark and foreboding video gave us a glimpse of the insidious nature of the love of money with stop-motion claymation. With lyrics as you see below, you know you are in for quite a ride. Beware, the cash cow lurks.

It glistened, it glowed, it rose from the gold of the children of Israel
(and most of the adults)
The Cash Cow
The golden Cash Cow had a body like the great cows of ancient Egypt
And a face like the face of Robert Tilton (without the horns)


If you blow off this warning, perhaps you’ve already been licked

7. Shine – Newsboys (1994)

The newsboys had been slowly gaining popularity. Their album Not Ashamed received quite a bit of recognition, but the release of the album Going Public put them on the trajectory to become one of CCM’s most loved bands. This quirky video perfectly captured this oddly fun song, and made us all want to Shine.

6. In the Valley of the Dying Sun – House of Heroes (2008)

This will be the most recent entry on this list. For CCM Backbeat, I usually do not talk about music this current, but some of the best Christian music is often music that Christian radio never played and many Christians have never heard. The same goes for Christian music videos. This video did receive play on several college markets, but it seemed to be largely ignored by Christian outlets.

Though not overtly Christian, this song and video hit hard, and through it we learned that House of Heroes could make seriously good music and videos as well. I will leave the rest for you to experience, but the song comes to a climax with these lines:

All through the night
I wrestled the angel
To undo the curse
That’s burdened me all of my life


And for the first time I could see
That God was not my enemy
“I’m thinking of you”


Like pieces of the sun
Our light burns on and on and on
Like stars in the night sky we shine
I’m living to shine on

5. Jesus is Just Alright – D.C. Talk (1992)

Let’s be honest, there is no way you can have a CCM backbeat on music videos without mentioning D.C. Talk, but you probably expected Jesus Freak or some later offering. Though Jesus Freak, and several that followed, perfectly captured the zeitgeist of 90s music, this was this video that made us all realise that these guys were not going away, and they were only getting better. You have to admit, this song still rocks, and this video still makes you want to get up and dance. It was this video that set the stage for many great videos that followed.

4. 666 – DeGarmo & Key (1984)

Regardless of whether or not your agree with the dispensational theology that undergirds this song, it deserves to be on the list for two reasons. First, the end times where on everyone’s mind in the 70s and 80s, and second, this is one of the first Christian music videos with production quality rivaling some of what was being played on MTV. This is actually the second version of this video. In the original, the beast is consumed in flames, and MTV said it was too much, so D & K toned it down to what you see here.

One top of all of that, there is an aspect of this song that is still relevant today. It may be sooner than we think when we will have to either deny some aspect of our faith or face arrest.

3. Mercy Mercy -77’s (1982)

Though this video never gained huge popularity with the evangelical crowd, due to misunderstanding the darkness of the video, not to mention the eye shadow, this song makes the list because it is one of the first Christian videos to make it into the rotation of a relatively new TV station called MTV. In the end, we are all sinful creatures with sinful natures that tempt us away from the Lord. We are destined for wrath unless the Lord has mercy on us.

I was wallowing
In a pit of snakes
They come crawling
Up around my legs
Now, I despise them
But I know
If they hypnotize me
Down, down I go

Then I say, Lord
Have mercy on me
I say, Lord
Have mercy

2. Know Me (Huh, What?) – The Cross Movement (1999)

This video reminded us, once again, that true hip hop can be theologically rich and make a statement at the same time. Who has not watched an awards show when a musician or actor thanks Jesus for some profane song or movie? For every one of those facepalm moments, this video is for you. Not much else needs to be said about this video. It speaks for itself. We all need to examine ourselves to see that we are in the faith.

1. Meltdown at Madame Tussauds- Steve Taylor (1984)

This is the second entry by Steve Taylor on this list, but he has earned it. The year is 1984, Christians are beginning to have some music and videos that are not behind the times, and we know it because of Meltdown. The moment the video starts, and you see Blair (Lisa Whelchel) from the sitcom The Facts of Life when it was at the height of its popularity, you know you are in for something good. This was not a sub-par offering. The video then proceeds to use the fire that destroyed the wax figures at Madame Tussauds wax museum as a metaphor for hell and so much more. The whole video comes to a point with these poignant lyrics:

“Celebrity status only got in the way
Had my hands in my pockets on the Judgment Day
You can’t take it with you, there’s fire in the hole
Had the world by the tail but I lost my soul”

What do you think of this list? Are there videos you would have included? Let us know in the comments below.

-D. Eaton